British tourist dies on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef

Published on : Saturday, November 19, 2016

British tourist fallsThe news of the death of a tourist in Australia’s iconic Great Barrier Reef is the third such incident in a week.

 

The 60-year old Englishman went for exploring the Reef and was found unconscious on the sea floor by fellow divers. The man was on his second dive of the day, from the boat, Silver Sonic, off the coast of Port Douglas, a popular tourist destination, 1,700 km north of Queensland’s capital of Brisbane.

 

“They brought him back to the surface, got him on board the boat, where they administered the oxygen and used a defibrillator,” Col McKenzie, executive director of the Association of Marine Park Tourism said.

 

“They called in to emergency services, a doctor was flown out to the Agincourt helicopter pad, and the doctor took part in that resuscitation event, but again, unsuccessful.”

 

On Wednesday, two French tourists in their mid-70’s suffered heart attacks and died, while snorkelling on the reef at Michaelmas Cay, 55 km south-east off the coast of Port Douglas.

 

A cardiologist said, the French tourists were likely stung by Irukandji jellyfish, a jellyfish the size of a fingernail, that is one of the most venomous creatures in the world.

 

Daniel Gschwind, CEO of the Queensland Tourism Industry Council, said, the sequence of events was incredibly tragic.

 

“But we have to bear in mind, every year two million people visit the Great Barrier Reef with commercial operators — that’s a great big number,” Gschwind told the ABC.

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One Response to British tourist dies on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef

  1. “But we have to bear in mind, every year two million people visit the Great Barrier Reef with commercial operators — that’s a great big number,” is no comfort to the families of the three tourists that have lost their lives. It is about time that the Association of Marine Park Tourism on the Great Barrier Reef took more definitive and preventative steps to stop these sorts of accidents occurring. At least, one would have expected that the Association and Qld Tourism Council would have announced a major review of current diving practices rather than just trumpeting annual tourism numbers, as if the deaths were simply a statistical anomaly! This seemingly dismissive attitude would be entirely unacceptable in other Australian industries from the perspective of duty of care and WHS considerations.

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