Florida may see the historic mass exodus for Hurricane Irma

Published on : Friday, September 8, 2017

hurricane-nicoleUnited States of America can witness the largest mass exodus in order to cope up with the disaster management for the advance of Hurricane Irma.

 

 

 

According to the National Hurricane Center, the eye of the storm is expected to make landfall Sunday morning in the Florida Keys and travel up the Atlantic coastline.

 

 

 

And the residents and visitors of Florida are preparing for the mass exodus, which include the local population and the tourists visiting Florida, which is causing most of the traffic delays on portions of Interstates 95 and 75 and the Florida Turnpike.

 

 

 

Monroe County evacuated 31,000 people, while Miami-Dade County, Miami Mayor Carlos Gimenez ordered more than 100,000 residents and tourists to abandon their homes on barrier islands such as Miami Beach and low-lying mainland areas. Broward County, where Fort Lauderdale is the largest business city, which has issued a mandatory evacuation for areas east of U.S. 1, an area with as many as 500,000 residents and tourists.

 

 

 

The management officials of Brevard County Emergency Management announced a obligatory order for more than 100,000 residents living on Merritt Island, an area near the Kennedy Space Center in central Florida, and along the coastal areas to leave their homes and condominiums beginning 3 p.m. Friday.

 

 

 

Nearly 6 million people live in the three most populous counties of Florida — Miami-Dade; Broward; and Palm Beach, the next county northward on the Atlantic coast. Thirteen Florida counties, including Monroe that straddles both coasts, line the Atlantic Ocean, and many have voluntary evacuation orders in place.

 

 

 

The Hurricane Irma evacuation orders are Florida’s largest since Hurricane Wilma in 2005. But this year it is expecting that the mass exodus will the greatest evacuation.

 

 

 

During Hurricane Rita in September 2005, it was estimated that around 2.5 million residents of Houston hit the road in Texas ahead of the storm’s arrival, creating gridlock that lasted for more than 20 hours and killing more than 100 people who were in evacuation.

 

 

 

 

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